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The images below are web pages (designed by Word of Eye) from commercial sites that are currently posted on the client’s site. Click an image to see a larger view of that page in a new window (close larger image window to return to this page), or you may click on the provided link to visit the site.

home page - sharonniederman.com

www.sharonniederman.com

Sharon Niederman is a writer who lives in Albuquerque and frequently writes about the Southwest. Although Sharon is an iBook ™ devotee, we decided that it would be fun to use typewriter imagery on her web site and business card. We also used the font Loveletter Typewriter for the "Sharon Niederman" logo.

mailing list form - sharonniederman.com

Sharon wanted a web site with a Southwestern feel, but she wanted to avoid the ubiquitous washed-out color palette of turquoise, desert sage and adobe rose. We decided to use rich, vivid colors instead. I have recently updated Sharon’s site design and changed the pages from a fixed size, magazine-style layout to a liquid (resizable) format. The new format loads faster, and also makes it easier to add new content. Sharon has recently finished a novel, “Return to Abo,” that was published in the spring of 2005. We added an entire new ”novel” section, including a sneak preview and a mailing list sign-up, to promote Sharon’s new book.

home page - magnumprecisionmachines.com

www.magnumprecisionmachines.com

Magnum Precision Machines had a web site that was built in house, but that site was not projecting the image that Magnum wished to convey to the public, and it lacked functionality. A redesign was in order. Since Magnum Precision Machines sells machine tools, we decided upon a slightly industrial look. Magnum wanted to use their black diamond logo, so I incorporated it into a larger logo with a machined metal look. I designed the navigation panel to resemble the digital display on a CNC machine. That was the first design that I did for Magnum three years ago.

home page redesigned - magnumprecisionmachines.com

As time passes, technology changes. So at the beginning of 2005, we decided that it was time for a new look for Magnum. The latest redesign keeps the color scheme and industrial look of the original site, but in this updated version, we went for a fluid layout (instead of fixed width), XHTML and more reliance on CSS (Cascading Style Sheets). I kept the JavaScript to a minimum, and I made certain that the site was fully functional for non-JavaScript users. The rollovers on the navigation bar were created by using CSS so the links are text links (instead of images that are switched with JavaScript) and can be easily changed should Magnum decide to add or remove pages.

a used machine page - magnumprecisionmachines.com

I also simplified the design of the individual "used machines" pages. Since inventory frequently changes, the use of CSS for navigation makes it easy to add and remove new machines without having to create buttons and write JavaScript. This saves me time and so saves the client money. Of course, not all browsers fully support XHTML and CSS properly, so I also made a backwards compatible site and wrote a browser switch that detects older browsers and serves them the appropriate pages.

home page - singeli.com

www.singeli.com

Singeli.com is photographer Singeli Agnew’s online portfolio. Because Singeli has taken so many wonderful photos, we knew it would take some time to select and scan all the photos we were considering. For this reason, I built this site in sections. We put the wedding portfolio up first. We then added portraits, life, food, travel and stillness.

weddings portfolio page - singeli.com

Designing a unique photography site was a challenge. It was of paramount importance to keep the pages simple and clean — allowing the photographs to speak for themselves. We decided to limit the use of color (except in the photos) to the navigation bar at the bottom of the pages and to confine most of the copy to the introductory page for each section.

intro to weddings page - singeli.com

For navigation, I used hyperlinks with no flashy JavaScript rollovers. I did use JavaScript to create popup windows, so the photographs could be viewed individually at a larger size.

home page - geckosbar.com

www.geckosbar.com

The web site for Gecko’s Bar & Tapas was done on extremely tight budget. The idea was to create a simple custom site that would be stylish and informative at a price that would be affordable to most small businesses. It’s basically a two page site with JavaScript popup windows. The photos were shot in one afternoon on location by Singeli Agnew.

home page - fogellawfirm.com

www.fogellawfirm.com

The Fogel Law Firm wanted a fairly conventional looking web site with buttons that rollover and a simple color palette. Instead of the usual “contact page,” I put the contact info on every page in a prominent position where it couldn’t be missed. All pages also feature “The Fogel Law Firm” logo, the injured worker image, the law firm slogan and the “Lawyer Advertisement” disclaimer (lest there be any confusion about the nature of the site). The main purpose of the site is to provide information about Workers’ Compensation to injured workers so that they may make an informed decision about contacting an attorney. To this end, I worked closely with the law firm to create an extensive “FAQ” page.

t-shirts page - thin-king-press.com

www.thin-king-press.com

Steve Lee is the creative force behind Thin King Press. He has been cranking out t-shirts, bumper stickers and posters for the Albuquerque band and bar scene for years. Steve’s original designs turn up in hip Nob Hill boutiques and recently, overseas in Japan. In a quest for global market dominance, Steve decided to launch a web site, and he created all the graphic artwork for the site himself. There was only one problem. Steve doesn’t know HTML! My job was to take Steve’s work and assemble it into a functional e-commerce site with popup windows, pulldown menus and lovely yellow “add to cart” buttons. We used the PayPal™ online system to automate payment and order processing. A final feature note: Steve’s sense of humor is not for everyone, and the site uses off-color language so we added “adult” content META tags to allow internet filters to keep youngsters out.

splash page - bellaweddingphoto.com

www.bellaweddingphoto.com

Bella Wedding Photography offers the professional services of photographers, Christina Kennedy and Maggie Mckinley for weddings in Albuquerque and Santa Fe. The site had to function as an online portfolio and provide information about the photographers and their services. The trick was to make the informative pages as visually compelling as the gallery pages.

contact page - bellaweddingphoto.com

Every one of the main pages on this site was designed to act as a stand alone advertisement for wedding photography as well as support the over-all look of the site.

a gallery page - bellaweddingphoto.com

The complimentary gallery page photos were chosen to combine with each other in an unspoken narrative that reflects the photojournalistic nature of the Christina’s and Maggie's photography. The small images on the gallery pages are clickable and linked to larger, uncropped versions of the same photo.

splash page - corsetandcloak.com

www.corsetandcloak.com

The Corset and Cloak site redesign was the result of the cumulative efforts of three designers: Charmaine G. Brown, fine artist and couture designer and owner of Corset and Cloak; Suzanne Sbarge, fine artist and graphic designer (visit her site www.suzannesbarge.com); Marcia Edgar (myself), graphic artist and web designer.

home page - corsetandcloak.com

The site's logo was designed by Suzanne Sbarge, and the splash and contact pages are my interpretation of a promotional postcard that Suzanne designed for Charmaine’s business. Of course, the unique and beautiful garments prominently featured throughout the site were designed and hand-crafted by Charmaine G. Brown. My challenge was, again, to showcase the work of others with a design that was complimentary to their vision and understated enough to remain in the background.